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Let’s get real about the concept of self-care. There is a lot of buzz on social media that celebrates and encourages the practice of self-care. They suggest engaging in yoga, mediation, eating foods that help your body, making therapy appointments or even taking a nap–all healthy ways to honor your body and mind. But, so many people are misunderstanding this concept as well. Many of the things they suggest as "self-care," may actually be self-sabotaging your health.
Have you ever seen the movie 13 Going on 30? If not, then spoiler alert! It’s about a 13 year old girl, who wishes on her 13th birthday to be 30. This is not an uncommon theme in movies (remember BIG, anyone?). The reason it’s a common theme is because it resonates with so many people.
The holiday season can bring up a plethora of emotions for all of us and these emotions can be positive, negative, and everything in between. All these emotions, combined with seasonal triggers, can make for some very overwhelming thoughts and can leave us prone to mood swings and emotional dysregulation. While people mean well this time of year, hearing "Happy Holidays!" over and over again can feel a bit invalidating or can invoke feelings like sadness or disappointment if life hasn’t felt so happy lately.
It’s common for people to struggle with negative views of themselves and the world they live in. However, overtime this leads to filtering out the truth, even the good or positive aspects of a situation, which is one of the catalysts for cultivating resistance to growth.
As human beings in a busy world, we want quick fixes for things and we want them… yesterday! And, who could blame us? We are spoiled in many ways when it comes to problem solving, efficiency and instant gratification. And, as such, we don’t have to put in that much effort.
Summer is officially in the rearview and fall is here. For some people, this elicits excitement over sweater weather and pumpkin spice everything. For others, it means dread over figuring out plans for the holidays. Anxiety over impending events (especially those that are still up in the air), is completely normal.
Have you ever been told that you're a "worry wart"? Do you often find yourself thinking about all the "what if’s" or "worst case scenarios" before entering a situation? Would you describe yourself or be described by others as an anxious or nervous individual? If you answered "yes" to these questions, keep reading. . .
The school year is back in full swing and many students we work with are feeling overwhelmed. Parents want nothing more than to help their children, but often, this isn’t the message their kids hear. What you say and how you say it can make all the difference in how your child feels and acts, so how do you communicate your concerns to them without it turning into an argument?
Crying is most commonly defined as the action of shedding tears as an expression of distress or pain. It can also be the action of expression of any emotion felt: happiness, anxiety, frustration, fear–the list goes on. It is the human body’s natural release of the strong feelings that we all, inevitably, feel.