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Have you ever taken a moment to listen to your inner voice? It’s that ongoing monologue in your mind when you are deep in thought....

Have you ever felt completely overwhelmed by an emotion and as a result, acted on that emotion, only to regret it later? I know I have. We’ve all experienced a moment when we've responded with an emotionally-charged text or email, later wishing we had never pressed send.
As life would have it, I often find myself moving at 1,000 miles per hour. I get into a chaotic routine of going from one thing to the next. Each day becomes the same multitasking-mess, where my body is in one place, checking things off my to-do list, while my head is in another, making sure I’m on to something else. Sound familiar?
I am that mom that let’s my daughter climb on the playground without shadowing her every move. I’m also the mom who let’s my daughter steal toys from other kids and vice versa without getting involved. Lastly, I’m that mom who will stand there and let my daughter have a tantrum without trying to stop it, regardless if we're in a public place or not.
When your child is struggling with intense emotions, it can be challenging to help them feel calm and in control. Intense emotions often escalate quickly, making it difficult to use problem-solving skills during a challenging situation. Parents, and individuals working with children, often forget that the developing mind doesn’t process as quickly as an adult brain, thus making it hard to self-soothe and regulate strong feelings.
Have you ever found yourself avoiding a topic or person in order to avoid discussing something uncomfortable? Difficult conversations are rarely something we look forward to. It doesn’t matter if it’s a romantic partner, a family member or a co-worker, tackling a tough topic is challenging. 
Procrastination. We’re all guilty of it, whether it's putting off washing the dishes until tomorrow or avoiding writing that research paper until the night before. Inevitably, we experience regret and vow never to procrastinate again.
Come summertime, it seems like every website or magazine compiles a list of the best "Summer Reads".  I don’t know about you, but I love them. I always look forward to having more time to curl up with a good book, especially when I am anticipating more free time, and preferably if that free time takes place on a beach.
Based on the title of this article, you may be expecting to read about the interpersonally effective significance of using the word please. Such as, "Mom and dad, can I stay out later tonight, please?" "Can you pick up milk from the grocery store, please?" Or, "make sure to clean your room, please."
I don’t know about you, but personally I find life transitions to be typically pretty stressful. While often these transitions have brought great happiness and excitement about the "next step" (i.e. moving in with a significant other, the birth of a child, or a move to somewhere new), let’s be honest – life changes can be hard AF.