Blog

Summer is officially in the rearview and fall is here. For some people, this elicits excitement over sweater weather and pumpkin spice everything. For others, it means dread over figuring out plans for the holidays. Anxiety over impending events (especially those that are still up in the air), is completely normal.
Have you ever been told that you're a "worry wart"? Do you often find yourself thinking about all the "what if’s" or "worst case scenarios" before entering a situation? Would you describe yourself or be described by others as an anxious or nervous individual? If you answered "yes" to these questions, keep reading. . .
The school year is back in full swing and many students we work with are feeling overwhelmed. Parents want nothing more than to help their children, but often, this isn’t the message their kids hear. What you say and how you say it can make all the difference in how your child feels and acts, so how do you communicate your concerns to them without it turning into an argument?
Crying is most commonly defined as the action of shedding tears as an expression of distress or pain. It can also be the action of expression of any emotion felt: happiness, anxiety, frustration, fear–the list goes on. It is the human body’s natural release of the strong feelings that we all, inevitably, feel.
It's no secret that quantity and quality of sleep have effects on an individual’s physical and mental health. Our bodies need rest in order to function at their optimum level. So, the obvious challenge arises–what to do when you struggle with disrupted sleep? 
Labor Day: A long weekend of barbeques, trips to the beach, retail sales and vacation. Also, the last weekend of summer and the last hoorah before school and fall schedules begin–YIKES! Labor Day tends to evoke two very different emotions in people–excitement over the former and dread over the latter. For many, summer consists of 2 months of relaxation, lighter workloads, no school and traveling. Transitioning from this lifestyle back to reality (5 day workweeks, school/homework, and a heavier workload) can send anyone into a frenzy!
As a DBT therapist, one of my primary goals when working with clients is to help supply effective skills and coping mechanisms to help them manage their emotions when things may be difficult. While reviewing these skills, I often find that these children, adolescents and young adults have had very little opportunity to build and/or practice coping mechanisms on their own since they were little.