Adulthood

Have you ever felt completely overwhelmed by an emotion and as a result, acted on that emotion, only to regret it later? I know I have. We’ve all experienced a moment when we've responded with an emotionally-charged text or email, later wishing we had never pressed send.
As life would have it, I often find myself moving at 1,000 miles per hour. I get into a chaotic routine of going from one thing to the next. Each day becomes the same multitasking-mess, where my body is in one place, checking things off my to-do list, while my head is in another, making sure I’m on to something else. Sound familiar?
Procrastination. We’re all guilty of it, whether it's putting off washing the dishes until tomorrow or avoiding writing that research paper until the night before. Inevitably, we experience regret and vow never to procrastinate again.
Have you ever seen the movie 13 Going on 30? If not, then spoiler alert! It’s about a 13 year old girl, who wishes on her 13th birthday to be 30. This is not an uncommon theme in movies (remember BIG, anyone?). The reason it’s a common theme is because it resonates with so many people.
It’s common for people to struggle with negative views of themselves and the world they live in. However, overtime this leads to filtering out the truth, even the good or positive aspects of a situation, which is one of the catalysts for cultivating resistance to growth.
Crying is most commonly defined as the action of shedding tears as an expression of distress or pain. It can also be the action of expression of any emotion felt: happiness, anxiety, frustration, fear–the list goes on. It is the human body’s natural release of the strong feelings that we all, inevitably, feel.
Negative experiences on social media can carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to young adults who are reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new study published in the journal Depression and Anxiety.