Confidence

People struggle with body image all year long, but the summer months can be particularly painful for many. It’s hot, which means more skin is...

Self-respect can be challenging to practice if you are a people-pleaser. The fear of saying no can keep you stuck in a cycle of neglecting your needs and giving into things that don’t serve you. When we let others take advantage of us, we chip away at our self-esteem, which leads to more anxiety, less interpersonal effectiveness and deteriorates our self-respect.
As we approach the new year, we often reflect on the past twelve months and what was accomplished. We may be proud of ourselves for the changes we have made and the success we have achieved. We may also feel disappointed that certain goals were not met. The New Year is a blank slate, and there is always pressure to map out what it may look like and what we want, or don’t want, it to look like. Have resolutions worked for you in the past? Great! If they haven’t, or cause you stress, here’s a way to start a new chapter in a positive way.
A couple of weeks ago, I was at an event for an animal shelter, of which I am on the board. I posed for a picture with a pup, and posted it on my social media accounts. Shortly thereafter, I got a direct message from a distant friend. I note distant friend, because this is a friend who I really only engage with on social media. She is a friend that I respect and admire, and one that doesn’t know much about me, my life history or what is currently going on in the personal life. The direct message said, "Your face looks so thin, did you lose weight?"
Do you know how to reduce social anxiety? Many of those who suffer from feeling insecure, shy or anxious anticipate the worst outcomes when it comes to engaging with others (even peers that they know). What many people don't recognize is that having some anxiety is healthy, we just don’t always know how to handle it. If you learn about how your body responds to fear, you can implement skills to feel more confident.
To show respect means to show someone (or something) admiration or to show appreciation for. Sometimes in life, it may be hard to show someone love and kindness or to show them how appreciative you are, but it is crucial for long-term growth and happiness. We may not always know how to show respect or remember to do it, so I've put together a list of 10 tips for treating others (and yourself) with respect. Use this as a regular reminder to treat others with respect.
No matter who you are, practicing self-care is important for your mental and physical health. It can be hard to shift the focus from family and friends to yourself, and it's necessary. In fact, if you want to be the best for everyone else, you've got to spend some time on yourself first. Self-care doesn't mean avoiding your work to go to the spa or a fancy dinner; it's more about adding in activities each day that help you feel good.
The way we speak to ourselves impacts every aspect of our lives. If we are critical and hard on ourselves, we become more stressed, depressed and insecure. Practicing self-compassion can help you become more motivated, self-assured and confident. Self-compassion research reveals that individuals who practice the core components are far less likely to suffer from mental health conditions and are more resilient.
For most of us, smartphones have become extensions of our hands. We rely on them for so much: to connect us to friends and family, to check the time, to manage our busy schedules, and if you’re in DBT therapy, to call your therapist for skills coaching. Our phones can be assets to our day, and they can also be distractions, leading us down a path of time-wasting and mindlessness. They can be reminders of all the stress in our lives, all the to-dos, and can be vehicles of jealousy and “FOMO” when on social media.

Could workouts after-school be more effective than studying? Heading home and hitting the books isn’t always the best idea according to new research. Contrary to...