Health

No matter who you are, practicing self-care is important for your mental and physical health. It can be hard to shift the focus from family and friends to yourself, and it's necessary. In fact, if you want to be the best for everyone else, you've got to spend some time on yourself first. Self-care doesn't mean avoiding your work to go to the spa or a fancy dinner; it's more about adding in activities each day that help you feel good.
Recently, I embarked on a series of conversations with people about their reasons for taking walks. I heard about a wide range of motivations. But surely one of the most compelling was walking as a way of coping with pain.
We all know the old adage, "You are what you eat." How many times did you hear that growing up? Or even still to this day? Now, while I think we are well aware that eating that double bacon cheeseburger will not turn you into the picture below; what if I told you there might be more truth behind that saying than you originally thought?
The way we speak to ourselves impacts every aspect of our lives. If we are critical and hard on ourselves, we become more stressed, depressed and insecure. Practicing self-compassion can help you become more motivated, self-assured and confident. Self-compassion research reveals that individuals who practice the core components are far less likely to suffer from mental health conditions and are more resilient.
Once we accept the reality of the current moment (however unpleasant it may be) for what it is, and not what we wish it were, we can turn our attention to ways to improve it. This skill is called "Radical Acceptance". Radical acceptance is hard to do, especially when it feels like accepting the situation is just impossible.

Mindfulness, a moment-by-moment awareness of one's thoughts, feelings and sensations, has gained worldwide popularity as a way to promote health and well-being. But what if someone isn't naturally mindful? Can they become so simply by trying to make mindfulness a "state of mind"? Or perhaps through a more focused, deliberate effort like meditation or mindfulness skills?

Stress can interfere with your mental and physical health tremendously. Everyday frustrations and mild "stressors" may seem minor, but your nervous system is taking note. That annoying traffic on your way to work or the group text message causing your phone to beep every five seconds impacts your mental and physical health. If you want to feel better, you've got to minimize the stressors in your life.
We've all been there – seated next to a snotting, sneezing, coughing person with no escape route available, worried that the next day we'll be the one hacking. But the truth is, catching an illness can't always be blamed on the obvious offenders. Though you can pick up germs just about anywhere (disturbingly, viruses can linger on surfaces such as ATMs and checkout-aisle pens for 48 hours), actually coming down with a cold or flu is a complex process–one that you can outsmart by following these stay-healthy tips.

Could workouts after-school be more effective than studying? Heading home and hitting the books isn’t always the best idea according to new research. Contrary to...