Learning

The link between academic struggles and depression can start as early as elementary school. A new study suggests that children who are doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically. But not for the reasons we typically expect.
The school year is back in full swing and many students we work with are feeling overwhelmed. Parents want nothing more than to help their children, but often, this isn’t the message their kids hear. What you say and how you say it can make all the difference in how your child feels and acts, so how do you communicate your concerns to them without it turning into an argument?
Test anxiety and the pressure to perform academically or professionally can be detrimental to one's self-esteem. Even some of the most brilliant people can struggle with managing their emotions when it comes to high-pressured situations like presentations, taking tests or speaking in front of others. If your child is showing signs of anxiety around school or if you are feeling overwhelmed about work, the tools in this post will be helpful.
With many of my clients transitioning from middle school to high school this past year, there has been a common theme with parents scrambling to put rules and guidelines in place. As a result, their teenagers are protesting: "I’m in high school! Why do I have MORE rules? That doesn’t make sense!"
Teens today are savvy–so many know about mental health, and yet, very few are aware of how unhealthy habits impact their mood and their ability to regulate their emotions. Although many teens may look (and act) like young adults, their brains are still developing. These habits may be "normal" for adults, but due to the sensitive nature of the teenage brain, they are very likely interfering with their mood and their overall mental health.
The brains of adolescents react more responsively to receiving rewards. This can lead to risky behavior, but, according to new research, it also has a positive function: it makes learning easier.
As we approach the new year, we often reflect on the past twelve months and what was accomplished. We may be proud of ourselves for the changes we have made and the success we have achieved. We may also feel disappointed that certain goals were not met. The New Year is a blank slate, and there is always pressure to map out what it may look like and what we want, or don’t want, it to look like. Have resolutions worked for you in the past? Great! If they haven’t, or cause you stress, here’s a way to start a new chapter in a positive way.
There has been a great deal of research demonstrating that the amount and quality of sleep we get affects our mental performance, mood and overall health. A new study that measured sleep and circadian rhythms, and the association to academic performance in college students found that irregular patterns of sleep and wakefulness correlated with lower grade point average, delayed sleep/wake timing, and delayed release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin.

Could workouts after-school be more effective than studying? Heading home and hitting the books isn’t always the best idea according to new research. Contrary to...