Mental Health

Based on the title of this article, you may be expecting to read about the interpersonally effective significance of using the word please. Such as, "Mom and dad, can I stay out later tonight, please?" "Can you pick up milk from the grocery store, please?" Or, "make sure to clean your room, please."
As a therapist and author, people often ask me what my favorite mental health books are. The books that I find myself constantly recommending, several times a week, to clients, friends and colleagues are listed here. Whether you’re a parent looking for tools to help your teen, a young adult trying to gain skills to manage your emotions or a clinician, these books are essential for all of us.
Let’s get real about the concept of self-care. There is a lot of buzz on social media that celebrates and encourages the practice of self-care. They suggest engaging in yoga, mediation, eating foods that help your body, making therapy appointments or even taking a nap–all healthy ways to honor your body and mind. But, so many people are misunderstanding this concept as well. Many of the things they suggest as "self-care," may actually be self-sabotaging your health.
It’s common for people to struggle with negative views of themselves and the world they live in. However, overtime this leads to filtering out the truth, even the good or positive aspects of a situation, which is one of the catalysts for cultivating resistance to growth.
As human beings in a busy world, we want quick fixes for things and we want them… yesterday! And, who could blame us? We are spoiled in many ways when it comes to problem solving, efficiency and instant gratification. And, as such, we don’t have to put in that much effort.
Negative experiences on social media can carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to young adults who are reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new study published in the journal Depression and Anxiety.
Don’t let the weather fool you – spring is finally here! What comes to mind at the start of this new season? Sunshine, flowers, the outdoors…CLEANING! Spring cleaning, in the traditional sense, refers to the yearly practice of thoroughly cleaning a home. Ridding the home of all the excess, the filth, the impurities can feel extremely satisfying and the physical act of cleaning can be therapeutic, as well. While this deep cleanse can require hard work and sufficient time, the final product is typically well worth it.
People generally like to feel happy, but achieving a state of happiness takes time and effort. Research has found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they don't have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy.
The other night, I found myself Googling "What is Wellness?" I thought this was kind of funny, considering that I think psychotherapy most definitely falls into part of a "wellness" routine; yet I was getting confused. Scrolling through my Instagram feed, the hashtag #wellness was coming up often (there are 16 million posts tagged with the term and counting), and it was making me question what that actually meant.
Valentine’s Day: the celebration of love and affection. Flowers, chocolate, a romantic dinner and a special gift for an intimate partner, love interest or crush is how society portrays the ideal expression of such. And well, let’s be honest…we all, in one way or another, have submitted to that expectation. Whether it be by making sure we give those things to another individual or feel badly because we did not receive them, we have allowed commercialization to dictate how "loved" we feel around this holiday.