self care Tag

The holiday season can bring up a plethora of emotions for all of us and these emotions can be positive, negative, and everything in between. All these emotions, combined with seasonal triggers, can make for some very overwhelming thoughts and can leave us prone to mood swings and emotional dysregulation. While people mean well this time of year, hearing "Happy Holidays!" over and over again can feel a bit invalidating or can invoke feelings like sadness or disappointment if life hasn’t felt so happy lately.
Valentine’s Day: the celebration of love and affection. Flowers, chocolate, a romantic dinner and a special gift for an intimate partner, love interest or crush is how society portrays the ideal expression of such. And well, let’s be honest…we all, in one way or another, have submitted to that expectation. Whether it be by making sure we give those things to another individual or feel badly because we did not receive them, we have allowed commercialization to dictate how "loved" we feel around this holiday.
There is no better time than today to adopt a self-care practice. Science shows taking time to tune in to your own needs leads to emotional stability, a stronger immune system and better relationships with others. Many people forget to take care of themselves before helping others, but it is vital. In the time it takes you to scroll through your social media feed or read an article about a celebrity, you could have been practicing self-care (and yes, sometimes trashy magazines count as a self-care practice).
No matter who you are, practicing self-care is important for your mental and physical health. It can be hard to shift the focus from family and friends to yourself, and it's necessary. In fact, if you want to be the best for everyone else, you've got to spend some time on yourself first. Self-care doesn't mean avoiding your work to go to the spa or a fancy dinner; it's more about adding in activities each day that help you feel good.
Recently, I embarked on a series of conversations with people about their reasons for taking walks. I heard about a wide range of motivations. But surely one of the most compelling was walking as a way of coping with pain.
The way we speak to ourselves impacts every aspect of our lives. If we are critical and hard on ourselves, we become more stressed, depressed and insecure. Practicing self-compassion can help you become more motivated, self-assured and confident. Self-compassion research reveals that individuals who practice the core components are far less likely to suffer from mental health conditions and are more resilient.