Blog

If your life looked drastically different ten days ago, the good news is you’re not alone. With the vast majority of Americans (and even the world) in some sort of self-quarantine, many of us are adapting to the "new normal," which can feel isolating, confusing, exhausting and a host of other emotions.
With the emergence of Coronavirus, it’s safe to say that we are all a little anxious as we approach a changing world and the unknown. While there are many articles out there about managing the anxiety and fear of COVID-19, I thought it would be important to take a look at some psychological strategies from Dialectical Behavior Therapy to help us cope.
Have you ever heard a person blame Mercury Retrograde for the cause of a mishap? The concept has become a common pop culture reference in memes and social media posts. Mercury Retrograde is considered the time when the planet Mercury appears to be moving backward, and astrologers believe that it can negatively affect communication and technology.
Imagine you need to do research to meet an important deadline. You sit down to work on it, but the TV is on in the background, your phone is buzzing with new updates on social media, and you haven’t eaten dinner yet. It’s difficult for even the most competent adult to manage these external factors and still meet their goal.
Anxiety is a hot topic these days and for us in the mental health field, it’s a topic we’ve been talking about for years. As a psychotherapist, it may come as a surprise that I’ve struggled with anxiety, but the beauty of this is that I very much empathize and understand what it may feel like for many of my clients.
One week into 2020 and New Year’s resolutions are in the air. But, do we really need this exact date to be goal-oriented or intentional in our lives? Of course not.

Have you ever taken a moment to listen to your inner voice? It’s that ongoing monologue in your mind when you are deep in thought....

Have you ever felt completely overwhelmed by an emotion and as a result, acted on that emotion, only to regret it later? I know I have. We’ve all experienced a moment when we've responded with an emotionally-charged text or email, later wishing we had never pressed send.
As life would have it, I often find myself moving at 1,000 miles per hour. I get into a chaotic routine of going from one thing to the next. Each day becomes the same multitasking-mess, where my body is in one place, checking things off my to-do list, while my head is in another, making sure I’m on to something else. Sound familiar?