Goals

It’s the New Year and everywhere we turn, we’re being told to set resolutions about how we want the year to go. There are stories in all the news and media outlets focused on how we should be changing as we move into the new year, as if a date is what we need to create new habits and identify ways to make improvements in our lives.

December, the last month of the calendar year, is often a month of reflection—a time when we think back on the past 11 months. Sometimes our thoughts become flooded with joyful and happy memories, while other times our hearts are filled with pain and sorrow.
One week into 2020 and New Year’s resolutions are in the air. But, do we really need this exact date to be goal-oriented or intentional in our lives? Of course not.
Everyone procrastinates. Whether it be homework assignments, work tasks, cleaning your room or apartment, running an errand, washing the dishes or even just getting into bed, at one time or another, we have all said to ourselves "I can do it later." While procrastination may be harmless at times, the habit of pushing things off can also have detrimental consequences. Lack of productivity can elicit feelings of guilt and inadequacy. It can contribute to poor performance at school or at work. We can even forget about a task all together if we procrastinate long enough.
Don’t let the weather fool you – spring is finally here! What comes to mind at the start of this new season? Sunshine, flowers, the outdoors…CLEANING! Spring cleaning, in the traditional sense, refers to the yearly practice of thoroughly cleaning a home. Ridding the home of all the excess, the filth, the impurities can feel extremely satisfying and the physical act of cleaning can be therapeutic, as well. While this deep cleanse can require hard work and sufficient time, the final product is typically well worth it.
People generally like to feel happy, but achieving a state of happiness takes time and effort. Research has found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they don't have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy.
New Year, New you” – How many times have you heard that from advertisers, brands and media? The idea of reinventing yourself with the start of a new year and starting fresh is not a new one. Resolutions have become imbedded with the idea of the New Year; without fail, every New Year I get asked on multiple occasions, “What’s your resolution?” (as if it’s a given).
As we approach the new year, we often reflect on the past twelve months and what was accomplished. We may be proud of ourselves for the changes we have made and the success we have achieved. We may also feel disappointed that certain goals were not met. The New Year is a blank slate, and there is always pressure to map out what it may look like and what we want, or don’t want, it to look like. Have resolutions worked for you in the past? Great! If they haven’t, or cause you stress, here’s a way to start a new chapter in a positive way.