Health

The world as we know it has changed rapidly since early March. Within a matter of days, our lives and our daily routines changed drastically. Adults are no longer going into a workplace and children are no longer attending school. Life milestones like graduations and weddings are being put on hold or cancelled and as a result, many people are experiencing increased feelings of frustration, sadness, and disappointment.
If your life looked drastically different ten days ago, the good news is you’re not alone. With the vast majority of Americans (and even the world) in some sort of self-quarantine, many of us are adapting to the "new normal," which can feel isolating, confusing, exhausting and a host of other emotions.
With the emergence of Coronavirus, it’s safe to say that we are all a little anxious as we approach a changing world and the unknown. While there are many articles out there about managing the anxiety and fear of COVID-19, I thought it would be important to take a look at some psychological strategies from Dialectical Behavior Therapy to help us cope.
Based on the title of this article, you may be expecting to read about the interpersonally effective significance of using the word please. Such as, "Mom and dad, can I stay out later tonight, please?" "Can you pick up milk from the grocery store, please?" Or, "make sure to clean your room, please."

People struggle with body image all year long, but the summer months can be particularly painful for many. It’s hot, which means more skin is...

Let’s get real about the concept of self-care. There is a lot of buzz on social media that celebrates and encourages the practice of self-care. They suggest engaging in yoga, mediation, eating foods that help your body, making therapy appointments or even taking a nap–all healthy ways to honor your body and mind. But, so many people are misunderstanding this concept as well. Many of the things they suggest as "self-care," may actually be self-sabotaging your health.
It's no secret that quantity and quality of sleep have effects on an individual’s physical and mental health. Our bodies need rest in order to function at their optimum level. So, the obvious challenge arises–what to do when you struggle with disrupted sleep? 
Summer is a trigger for anyone struggling with an eating disorder, body image issues or a mental health condition. The lack of structure in the summer months can lead to disrupted routines, which can lead to an increase in emotion dysregulation and unhealthy behaviors.