Health

The other night, I found myself Googling "What is Wellness?" I thought this was kind of funny, considering that I think psychotherapy most definitely falls into part of a "wellness" routine; yet I was getting confused. Scrolling through my Instagram feed, the hashtag #wellness was coming up often (there are 16 million posts tagged with the term and counting), and it was making me question what that actually meant.
New Year, New you” – How many times have you heard that from advertisers, brands and media? The idea of reinventing yourself with the start of a new year and starting fresh is not a new one. Resolutions have become imbedded with the idea of the New Year; without fail, every New Year I get asked on multiple occasions, “What’s your resolution?” (as if it’s a given).
As we approach the new year, we often reflect on the past twelve months and what was accomplished. We may be proud of ourselves for the changes we have made and the success we have achieved. We may also feel disappointed that certain goals were not met. The New Year is a blank slate, and there is always pressure to map out what it may look like and what we want, or don’t want, it to look like. Have resolutions worked for you in the past? Great! If they haven’t, or cause you stress, here’s a way to start a new chapter in a positive way.
To show respect means to show someone (or something) admiration or to show appreciation for. Sometimes in life, it may be hard to show someone love and kindness or to show them how appreciative you are, but it is crucial for long-term growth and happiness. We may not always know how to show respect or remember to do it, so I've put together a list of 10 tips for treating others (and yourself) with respect. Use this as a regular reminder to treat others with respect.
No matter who you are, practicing self-care is important for your mental and physical health. It can be hard to shift the focus from family and friends to yourself, and it's necessary. In fact, if you want to be the best for everyone else, you've got to spend some time on yourself first. Self-care doesn't mean avoiding your work to go to the spa or a fancy dinner; it's more about adding in activities each day that help you feel good.
Recently, I embarked on a series of conversations with people about their reasons for taking walks. I heard about a wide range of motivations. But surely one of the most compelling was walking as a way of coping with pain.
We all know the old adage, "You are what you eat." How many times did you hear that growing up? Or even still to this day? Now, while I think we are well aware that eating that double bacon cheeseburger will not turn you into the picture below; what if I told you there might be more truth behind that saying than you originally thought?
The way we speak to ourselves impacts every aspect of our lives. If we are critical and hard on ourselves, we become more stressed, depressed and insecure. Practicing self-compassion can help you become more motivated, self-assured and confident. Self-compassion research reveals that individuals who practice the core components are far less likely to suffer from mental health conditions and are more resilient.
Once we accept the reality of the current moment (however unpleasant it may be) for what it is, and not what we wish it were, we can turn our attention to ways to improve it. This skill is called "Radical Acceptance". Radical acceptance is hard to do, especially when it feels like accepting the situation is just impossible.

Mindfulness, a moment-by-moment awareness of one's thoughts, feelings and sensations, has gained worldwide popularity as a way to promote health and well-being. But what if someone isn't naturally mindful? Can they become so simply by trying to make mindfulness a "state of mind"? Or perhaps through a more focused, deliberate effort like meditation or mindfulness skills?