Mental Health

Mindfulness. We’re hearing that word a lot lately. Unfortunately, most of us don’t even really know what it means and why it is important. We also often associate it with new age practices, which, for many of us, may cause us to rule it out before even exploring it as a concept.
National Suicide Prevention Week is September 6-12th, with World Suicide Prevention Day on September 10th. Suicide currently ranks as the second leading cause of death amongst those ages 10-24. Suicide is a preventable death. We just have to know what to look for in order to provide the help needed.
I’ve been thinking a lot about dialectics during this Pandemic. If you are new to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), a dialectic is defined in DBT as two truths that coexist, even if they seem opposite. The dialectic that strikes me the most is the truth that we are seemingly living in very primitive times with a virus that has no known cure, even though we are so technologically advanced.
At this time of uncertainty, when the world is upside down, we at HPS stand in support of all people of color because we believe black lives matter. We believe that the most important thing for all of us to do at this time is to talk: talk about what’s happening, talk about our biases, talk about how to work toward change.
The world as we know it has changed rapidly since early March. Within a matter of days, our lives and our daily routines changed drastically. Adults are no longer going into a workplace and children are no longer attending school. Life milestones like graduations and weddings are being put on hold or cancelled and as a result, many people are experiencing increased feelings of frustration, sadness, and disappointment.
As life would have it, I often find myself moving at 1,000 miles per hour. I get into a chaotic routine of going from one thing to the next. Each day becomes the same multitasking-mess, where my body is in one place, checking things off my to-do list, while my head is in another, making sure I’m on to something else. Sound familiar?
Based on the title of this article, you may be expecting to read about the interpersonally effective significance of using the word please. Such as, "Mom and dad, can I stay out later tonight, please?" "Can you pick up milk from the grocery store, please?" Or, "make sure to clean your room, please."
As a therapist and author, people often ask me what my favorite mental health books are. The books that I find myself constantly recommending, several times a week, to clients, friends and colleagues are listed here. Whether you’re a parent looking for tools to help your teen, a young adult trying to gain skills to manage your emotions or a clinician, these books are essential for all of us.