Mental Health

It is mid-January and we are already well into a new year. It is at this point where the resolutions are not as attractive as they were a couple weeks ago. If this is true for you, it is completely human, and you are not alone.
At the start of every year, we are bombarded with information about what resolutions we need to make, how to change, how to be better, or how to be something other than ourselves. What a horrible way to begin a new year—feeling as if you already aren’t good enough.
I often find in my personal life and with clients that identifying a problem is easy. Almost too easy! We are all constantly faced with challenges that can range on a level of significance and impact. Despite where these challenges fall on that spectrum, how we respond to them remains the same.
This is one of my favorite times of the year, with Thanksgiving just around the corner—the changing of seasons, festive foods, and togetherness with loved ones. It is a time when we are reminded to be thankful for the things our lives include, and the holiday can lift our spirits as being grateful is the essence of Thanksgiving!
Science has made some incredible impacts in being able to make this pandemic more bearable. We have come a long way since 2020 with vaccines and a greater understanding of how we can safely navigate and reengage with each other.
When working with clients and teaching mindfulness, I recommend them to "find magic in the mundane." It’s a phrase I use to describe being present with anything ordinary, while also noticing all the sensory experiences about the situation that make it unique. 
May is Mental Health Awareness Month. It’s important to stop and think about what that means and why we need to focus on it. It’s also important to highlight why we need to stop conflating mental health and mental illness and the issues that arise when we do.
May is Mental Health Awareness Month, so we asked the Hartstein Psychological Services team to share their thoughts on what mental health means to them, why it’s important to attend to it and how to ensure your mental health is a priority. Here's what they said:
Burnout is a state of emotional, mental and often physical exhaustion brought on by prolonged or repeated stress. It is most commonly associated with work-related stressors, however, it can also appear in other areas of life such as school, care-taking, relationships and parenting.
Mindfulness. We’re hearing that word a lot lately. Unfortunately, most of us don’t even really know what it means and why it is important. We also often associate it with new age practices, which, for many of us, may cause us to rule it out before even exploring it as a concept.