Mindfulness

Don’t let the weather fool you – spring is finally here! What comes to mind at the start of this new season? Sunshine, flowers, the outdoors…CLEANING! Spring cleaning, in the traditional sense, refers to the yearly practice of thoroughly cleaning a home. Ridding the home of all the excess, the filth, the impurities can feel extremely satisfying and the physical act of cleaning can be therapeutic, as well. While this deep cleanse can require hard work and sufficient time, the final product is typically well worth it.
There is no better time than today to adopt a self-care practice. Science shows taking time to tune in to your own needs leads to emotional stability, a stronger immune system and better relationships with others. Many people forget to take care of themselves before helping others, but it is vital. In the time it takes you to scroll through your social media feed or read an article about a celebrity, you could have been practicing self-care (and yes, sometimes trashy magazines count as a self-care practice).
New Year, New you” – How many times have you heard that from advertisers, brands and media? The idea of reinventing yourself with the start of a new year and starting fresh is not a new one. Resolutions have become imbedded with the idea of the New Year; without fail, every New Year I get asked on multiple occasions, “What’s your resolution?” (as if it’s a given).
As we approach the new year, we often reflect on the past twelve months and what was accomplished. We may be proud of ourselves for the changes we have made and the success we have achieved. We may also feel disappointed that certain goals were not met. The New Year is a blank slate, and there is always pressure to map out what it may look like and what we want, or don’t want, it to look like. Have resolutions worked for you in the past? Great! If they haven’t, or cause you stress, here’s a way to start a new chapter in a positive way.
Radical acceptance is a skill we teach in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) that aims to help you move from anger and pain to acceptance of the realities of life. It is the key to feeling more in control of your emotions. We all face situations in life that interfere with our mental health and overall happiness and learning how to radically accept them can make a profound difference in your life.
Becoming a parent is an incredible gift–an event so large your life will truly never be the same again. From middle of the night wake-ups, to a house taken over by toys, jumpers, strollers and everything in between; your life is no longer "yours". This past weekend I woke up to a rainy, grey Sunday. My immediate thought was 'what a perfect day to stay in my PJ’s, curl up on the couch and binge watch the newest Netflix docu-series.' I was then immediately brought back to earth by my 6-month-old beckoning me to her crib at 6 a.m.
Many of us deal with stress and frustration multiple times each day. From delays on the subway to friendship or family drama, these events can interfere with your mood and create more emotional dysregulation if they are pushed away or ignored. During these times, the IMPROVE skill, developed by Marsha Linehan, can be used to reduce the intensity of their emotions in any kind of situation and feel more in control of their lives.
Do you know how to reduce social anxiety? Many of those who suffer from feeling insecure, shy or anxious anticipate the worst outcomes when it comes to engaging with others (even peers that they know). What many people don't recognize is that having some anxiety is healthy, we just don’t always know how to handle it. If you learn about how your body responds to fear, you can implement skills to feel more confident.
To show respect means to show someone (or something) admiration or to show appreciation for. Sometimes in life, it may be hard to show someone love and kindness or to show them how appreciative you are, but it is crucial for long-term growth and happiness. We may not always know how to show respect or remember to do it, so I've put together a list of 10 tips for treating others (and yourself) with respect. Use this as a regular reminder to treat others with respect.