dialectical behavior therapy Tag

When many of us hear the term “reopening,” we automatically feel anxious. Keep in mind this feeling is quite functional, as our body and brain are trying to protect us from the unknown. However, it can be extremely painful to tolerate these fearful emotions.
Life is filled with uncomfortable moments. These situations vary in intensity, from something less extreme—like noticing our phone battery is dying or sitting in traffic, to going through a breakup or losing a loved one—everyone experiences emotional discomfort at one point or another.
December, the last month of the calendar year, is often a month of reflection—a time when we think back on the past 11 months. Sometimes our thoughts become flooded with joyful and happy memories, while other times our hearts are filled with pain and sorrow.
Regardless of your political leanings, we can all agree that these are highly charged times. Opinions are varying and different and we aren’t always taking the time to listen to one another. In fact, we often just speak louder, thinking that will get the other person to listen. Spoiler alert: that doesn’t work.
Fall is typically a time of transition for most people, regardless of age or stage of life. School-age children are returning from their school-free summers. College students are returning to school, often after a summer of exposure to the working-world through a job or internship. And, working adults and parents also adjust to a more structured routine.
I’ve been thinking a lot about dialectics during this Pandemic. If you are new to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), a dialectic is defined in DBT as two truths that coexist, even if they seem opposite. The dialectic that strikes me the most is the truth that we are seemingly living in very primitive times with a virus that has no known cure, even though we are so technologically advanced.
We are over three months into a world pandemic, and many people are understandably struggling with their mental health. In order to prevent the spread of a deadly illness people are being asked to manage so many variables: new hygiene practices such as masks and social distancing, working from home, managing unemployment, childcare, and/or daily fears of the unknown.
At this time of uncertainty, when the world is upside down, we at HPS stand in support of all people of color because we believe black lives matter. We believe that the most important thing for all of us to do at this time is to talk: talk about what’s happening, talk about our biases, talk about how to work toward change.
I recently noticed a friend of mine who posted exquisite photos on her social media profile. She isn’t a professional photographer, but she has a knack for capturing the world. I mentioned how impressed I was of her ability, and she replied, "it's all in the lighting, my friend." In that moment, it struck me how important this concept is now more than ever, and not just in regards to Instagram photos.