Emily Roberts, MA, LMHC Tag

There are a lot of unknowns right now. Will you go back to work or school? Will you be able to travel to see your relatives? Is it safe to see “that friend” or go to “that appointment”? Our bodies and brains tend to do one of two things—we either push the feelings of anxiety and fear away, or we obsess and overthink about the possible outcomes.
Anxiety is a hot topic these days and for us in the mental health field, it’s a topic we’ve been talking about for years. As a psychotherapist, it may come as a surprise that I’ve struggled with anxiety, but the beauty of this is that I very much empathize and understand what it may feel like for many of my clients.
When your child is struggling with intense emotions, it can be challenging to help them feel calm and in control. Intense emotions often escalate quickly, making it difficult to use problem-solving skills during a challenging situation. Parents, and individuals working with children, often forget that the developing mind doesn’t process as quickly as an adult brain, thus making it hard to self-soothe and regulate strong feelings.

People struggle with body image all year long, but the summer months can be particularly painful for many. It’s hot, which means more skin is...

As a therapist and author, people often ask me what my favorite mental health books are. The books that I find myself constantly recommending, several times a week, to clients, friends and colleagues are listed here. Whether you’re a parent looking for tools to help your teen, a young adult trying to gain skills to manage your emotions or a clinician, these books are essential for all of us.
Let’s get real about the concept of self-care. There is a lot of buzz on social media that celebrates and encourages the practice of self-care. They suggest engaging in yoga, mediation, eating foods that help your body, making therapy appointments or even taking a nap–all healthy ways to honor your body and mind. But, so many people are misunderstanding this concept as well. Many of the things they suggest as "self-care," may actually be self-sabotaging your health.
It’s common for people to struggle with negative views of themselves and the world they live in. However, overtime this leads to filtering out the truth, even the good or positive aspects of a situation, which is one of the catalysts for cultivating resistance to growth.
The school year is back in full swing and many students we work with are feeling overwhelmed. Parents want nothing more than to help their children, but often, this isn’t the message their kids hear. What you say and how you say it can make all the difference in how your child feels and acts, so how do you communicate your concerns to them without it turning into an argument?
Summer is a trigger for anyone struggling with an eating disorder, body image issues or a mental health condition. The lack of structure in the summer months can lead to disrupted routines, which can lead to an increase in emotion dysregulation and unhealthy behaviors.