Jennifer Jamgochian Tag

Winter in the Northeast can be challenging on a good day. The colder temperatures, fewer daylight hours, and wet weather can take a toll on our emotions. It’s easy to go into hibernation mode and lose steam during the long winter months. We may have the urge to spend more time sleeping, binge-watching Netflix, or eating our favorite comfort foods.
The world as we know it has changed rapidly since early March. Within a matter of days, our lives and our daily routines changed drastically. Adults are no longer going into a workplace and children are no longer attending school. Life milestones like graduations and weddings are being put on hold or cancelled and as a result, many people are experiencing increased feelings of frustration, sadness, and disappointment.
Imagine you need to do research to meet an important deadline. You sit down to work on it, but the TV is on in the background, your phone is buzzing with new updates on social media, and you haven’t eaten dinner yet. It’s difficult for even the most competent adult to manage these external factors and still meet their goal.
Have you ever felt completely overwhelmed by an emotion and as a result, acted on that emotion, only to regret it later? I know I have. We’ve all experienced a moment when we've responded with an emotionally-charged text or email, later wishing we had never pressed send.
Procrastination. We’re all guilty of it, whether it's putting off washing the dishes until tomorrow or avoiding writing that research paper until the night before. Inevitably, we experience regret and vow never to procrastinate again.

The rapid digitalization of modern society affects people differently. For parents in particular, this age has added an extra hurdle; they now must endeavor to guide their children through both the real world and the virtual world.

We’ve all heard of helicopter parenting – the practice of hovering anxiously near one's children, monitoring their every movement. Now, experts have identified a new category of parenting, even more extreme in some aspects than helicopter parenting, known as "snowplow parenting".