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Insomnia is linked to frequency of alcohol use among early adolescents, according to a new research. Parents, educators, and therapists should consider insomnia to be a risk marker for alcohol use, and alcohol use a risk marker for insomnia, among early adolescents according to a study published recently in the journal Addictive Behaviors.
Sound familiar? Your child with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) fidgets and squirms his way through school and homework, but seems laser-focused and motionless sitting in front of the TV watching an action thriller. When a parent or a teacher sees a child who can sit perfectly still in one condition and yet in another they're all over the place, the first thing they say is, “well, they could sit still if they wanted to.”
Research published in the journal Psychological Medicine found that the onset of a new mental disorder may be a consequence of exclusion from school. Excluded children can develop a range of mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety as well as behavioral problems. There can be a long-term impact on education and progress by excluding a child from school. This study suggests that their mental health may also deteriorate.
There has been a great deal of research demonstrating that the amount and quality of sleep we get affects our mental performance, mood and overall health. A new study that measured sleep and circadian rhythms, and the association to academic performance in college students found that irregular patterns of sleep and wakefulness correlated with lower grade point average, delayed sleep/wake timing, and delayed release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin.
A new study from Duke University found (as expected) that technology use can lead to increases in attention, behavior, and self-regulation problems in adolescents, but some positive outcomes to technology use were found as well. On days that adolescents spent more time using digital technologies, they were also less likely to report symptoms of depression and anxiety.
The rate of adolescents reporting a recent bout of clinical depression grew by 37 percent over the decade ending in 2014, with one in six girls reporting an episode in the past year, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. The findings, published online Nov. 14 in the journal Pediatrics, highlight a need to focus on the mental well-being of young people and match those in peril with mental health professionals.
Most self-aware adults tend to avoid making biased or discriminatory comments in the presence of children. But new research from the University of Washington suggests that preschool-aged children can learn bias even through nonverbal signals displayed by adults, such as a condescending tone of voice or a disapproving look.
Kids are thinking about race and gender, and not just in terms of being able to identify with these social categories, but also what they mean and why they matter. Children are bombarded by messages about race, gender and social stereotypes. These implicit and explicit messages rapidly influence their self-concepts and aspirations.

Mindfulness, a moment-by-moment awareness of one's thoughts, feelings and sensations, has gained worldwide popularity as a way to promote health and well-being. But what if someone isn't naturally mindful? Can they become so simply by trying to make mindfulness a "state of mind"? Or perhaps through a more focused, deliberate effort like meditation or mindfulness skills?

The emotional environment of the family has long been thought crucial to adolescent development. Parents, in particular, are essential during the teen years for providing guidance and support that fosters the successful transition from childhood to adulthood.