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The first week of November is International Stress Awareness week. In honor of that, and, in honor of the upcoming holiday season that often causes a lot of people to feel stressed, let’s take a couple of minutes to talk about what stress is and what you can do to more effectively manage it.
Setting and protecting your boundaries is a process; it takes insight into your own needs, patience in working them into your relationships, and maintenance for them.
Sometimes, when I think about the fact that September is National Suicide Prevention month, I can’t help but wish it was unnecessary. Unfortunately, the numbers tell us it is.
As summer comes to an end, a lot of change is on the horizon—starting school, coming back from vacation, new job tasks, and changing seasons. It can be hard to take control of any anxiety that you may be experiencing.
Imagine that you were asked to cross a narrow bridge that was 1 foot above the ground. Would you feel confident about that task? Now change the situation and make it 50 feet above the ground. Then 100 feet. Would that change how you feel from the original task?
Throughout my years as a clinician working with children, parents have often asked, "how can I motivate my child?" Most of us misunderstand motivation. We think what motivates us will also motivate our children.  However, that’s not necessarily the case.
April is Stress Awareness month. Everyone experiences stress, we just all experience it differently. Stress is the reaction to certain situations when a person feels anxious or threatened. It’s an "in the moment" reaction that can have a lasting impact on your body.
Sure, you’ve heard of mindfulness and why it should be part of your daily routine, but do you know how to actually put it into practice? Mindfulness, the ability to be fully present in a moment, has many proven benefits, from reducing depression and anxiety to improving sleep and reducing stress and chronic pain.
It is mid-January and we are already well into a new year. It is at this point where the resolutions are not as attractive as they were a couple weeks ago. If this is true for you, it is completely human, and you are not alone.
At the start of every year, we are bombarded with information about what resolutions we need to make, how to change, how to be better, or how to be something other than ourselves. What a horrible way to begin a new year—feeling as if you already aren’t good enough.
As is becoming our standard operating procedure, Hartstein Psychological Services will be closed for the week between Christmas and the New Year. We recognize the need to practice what we preach and know that self-care is one of the important things on which we need to focus.